Slow Money NW Food and Farm Investor Meeting

SOLD OUT

Sorry, no more tickets available. Please let us know if you are interested in attending another investor meeting coming early next year.

Slow Money Northwest
invites you to its inaugural

Food and Farm Investor Meeting
Monday, November 15, 2010 6:30-9 pm
emmer&rye
1825 Queen Anne Ave N, Seattle


Have you wondered how you can invest in the emerging food economy — the Northwest-based farmers and food artisans who contribute to sustainability and our health by producing mouth-watering local organic fare?

That’s what Slow Money Northwest is all about.

Please join us for our inaugural event on November 15 to learn more about opportunities for investing in our regional food economy.

On this particular evening, we will also feature two investment opportunities for local angel investors: Willie Green’s Organic Farm and Heritage Meats. During the meeting we will enjoy regional cuisine by celebrated chef Seth Caswell, owner of emmer&rye.

WHEN AND WHERE
Monday, November 15, 2010 6:30-9 pm
emmer&rye
1825 Queen Anne Ave N, Seattle
Purchase tickets now

WHAT CAN I EXPECT
Slow Money NW overview, growth stage investment deals, engagement with the emerging local food angel network, peer-to-peer knowledge sharing, great food and beverages.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
State and federal securities laws require that this event is open only to accredited investors. Please contact Tim Crosby with any questions about attending (206-300-9860).

Space is limited. Tickets are $35 per person and includes food and some wine or beer.

This announcement is neither made on behalf of any issuer of a security nor constitutes an offer on behalf of any issuer to sell securities in the state of Washington.

The Food Assistance National Input-Output Multiplier Model and Stimulus Effects of SNAP

USDA just released a report “The Food Assistance National Input-Output Multiplier (FANIOM) Model and Stimulus Effects of SNAP“. USDA’s Economic Research Service “uses the FANIOM model to represent and measure linkages between USDA’s domestic food assistance programs, agriculture, and the U.S. economy.

From the executive summary:

The FANIOM analysis of SNAP benefits as a fiscal stimulus finds that:

  • An increase of $1 billion in SNAP expenditures is estimated to increase economic activity (GDP) by $1.79 billion. In other words, every $5 in new SNAP benefits generates as much as $9 of economic activity. This multiplier estimate replaces a similar but older estimate of $1.84 billion reported in Hanson and Golan (2002).
  • The jobs impact estimates from FANIOM range from 8,900 to 17,900 full-time equivalent jobs plus self-employed for a $1-billion increase in SNAP benefits. The preferred jobs impact estimates are the 8,900 full-time equivalent jobs plus self-employed or the 9,800 full-time and part-time jobs plus self-employed from $1 billion of SNAP benefits (type I multiplier).
  • Imports reduce the impact of the multiplier effects on the domestic economy by about 12 percent.

Source: Kenneth Hanson, “The Food Assistance National Input-Output Multiplier (FANIOM) Model and Stimulus Effects of SNAP”, USDA Economic Research Report No. (ERR-103) 50 pp, October 2010, viewed 10-4-10 http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/ERR103/